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I wrote a post about the process of recreating the Windows Live avatar look yesterday: Recreating the Windows Live Messenger Avatar in CSS

I haven’t written a lot of technical blog posts like this, so feedback is welcome. Should I have made it more technical by including more code rather than linking to CodePen? Or perhaps it should be less technical?

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Ooh, I might be able to make use of that as I further refine my recent site redesign.

Speaking of which, I did put up a short lil’ blog post about that.

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I haven’t been writing this month but I did post about how making websites should be easy last week.

Looking forward to writing more during March.

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i wrote some half-baked thoughts (and dug up some old writing to include) on the changing seasons and my desire to find meaning in the mundane: a sense of springtime » saturn.town

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gosh, we are such kindred spirits; i at least feel that way reading your post. rituals have become much more important to me as i get older, and i’ve begun incorporating seasonal rituals to signify not just the changing of the seasons but the passage of time as my routine is, frankly, chaotic atm. :joy: it’s so easy for me to get lost in projects and things i want to do that deliberately having to slow down has been an important and necessary change in my life to actually have me appreciate the things that i’m doing to enjoy them (and life) while i can.

thanks for writing this <3 i’m inspired to write about some rituals!

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actually a big fan of this blog post as a way to tell a story of a code problem! i think you delivered an easy-to-follow narrative and actually balanced the technicalities pretty well, in my opinion!

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hello ! first time in the forum :-) that I was following through RSS.
I’m very new to small web and blogroll, I had a blog for years without posting but recently I revived it and I’m trying every week to enrich my blog with some experiments, new pages, etc, taking inspiration from what I observe in other websites.

so let me share my recent blog post, mostly some guides and tips (and maybe rants) related to my own experience struggling with infinite content , todo lists, and FOMO, and encouraging people to quit social media and have fun making something cool or make their own personal web space and blog posts.

https://morgan.zoemp.be/shrink/

I’m glad to get some feedback and visitors :-) but I mostly write for myself as intended.
hope you enjoy the lecture, have a great day !

Morgan from Brussels :belgium: :beers:

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Oh no, another Belgian! Can this community handle that? :joy:

My own personal Gimli’s axe is called “Firefox or my entire dodgy Linux install freezing and taking all my open tabs with me”. My read and watch later lists fortunately never get too big because I hold things to pretty high standards (for better or for worse).

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Great thoughts! Your post reminded me of the call to delete all of one’s drafts that have been hanging around as of Feb 29th, or finish them, in honor of the leap year!

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:memo: New post: Building My Comics Page: How I built my comics page using League of Comic Geeks, a NodeJS module and Eleventy. :fire:

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hello new here! wanted to share that I’m hosting this month’s IndieWeb Carnival over on my blog - this month’s theme is “accessibility on the small web”

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after working on this one for a couple of months, i’ve finally published my childfree blog post, a compilation of questions i’ve received over the years. i kind of wanted a place to keep these questions because this decision is such a big part of who i am, especially as i grow older without children.

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I, still, have not started working on my project. I really should start doing the bloody thing

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This was a really great read, xandra! I do find it interesting (in a disappointing way) how wildly the reactions to being childfree differ depending on your gender. For me, when I’ve told people I don’t want kids, the reaction I usually get ranges from something along the lines of “cool, do what you want” to “hell yeah brother, having kids sucks!” The latter one often comes from men who have kids, which causes me some concern for their children. This is completely different from the reactions my wife gets, which are more in line with what you described in your post. It’s surprising how many people are just uncomfortable with the idea that some people don’t want kids. Maybe they didn’t realize it was an option.

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If you’re a childfree couple, I think there’s only one appropriate response from childful couples…

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@cobycat I’m curious how you stick to high standards, I mean I try to pick the best among my 21K links saved through the years and shrink it to something with only a few hundred of thousands of content that I could share somewhere. Maybe the goal is bad, but I’ve managed to save links for a decade and chase for old web pages because of the nostalgia trap. I realize this does not make sense to keep that much content over years that I rarely re-read but from time to time it proves useful to find something that way as search engines and computer/browsers histories seem less useful at this game. Also browsing pages make me discover many other pages, and that’s also in essence why I start bookmarking stuff for later read and to justify the amount of hours spent finding them.
It seems also that even my 5K links collection on Git had attracted the likes of hundred links consumers :crazy_face: (I don’t get why my private collection of links was interesting to hundred random strangers but I was encouraged to continue).
I could take some ideas :-) !
Thanks for reading my blog post and by the way I posted another one about “don’t bookmark” :-)

I watched a cartoon and wrote what I thought about it.

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My standards for links are slightly less high than my standards for videos to watch (mostly because time investment).The first time I went over my regular bookmarks and articles saved in Pocket, it quickly became clear to me that a lot of things I initially saved were outdated (in the bad way). Articles that cover stuff that I can easily find elsewhere in more detail, or otherwise ephemeral concerns, either in their content or how I needed them at the time I bookmarked them.

I now strictly separate my “look into this later” bookmarks from my actual bookmarks. And then I regularly sift through my actual bookmarks to add to my own Links page. Since my Links page has descriptions for every link, that adds a certain barrier. If I can’t be bothered to add even a small description, then maybe it’s not really worth sharing. Similarly, if I finished an article I saved, I only archive it if I actually think it has a timeless value. And then I sometimes go through my archived values to add them to my website. And because my Links pages have become my “single source of truth” for most bookmarks, it makes what still remains a lot more ordered.

Another limiting factor for me is that I don’t bother with some very common stuff, like practical/productivity stuff. It feels to me that there are already many curated lists focusing on those (like those awesome x lists on Github), so leaving it to those lists narrows the focus of my efforts. The reason I publicly share my list is because I want myself and others to find things that due to the decline of mainstream search engines aren’t easily found anymore. Though at this point I’m also kinda struggling with what to do with links that just don’t really fit with the vibe of my website. Like, more ideological stuff. . .

21 thousand bookmarks, that’s a real lot, though. That just seems too unwieldy too manage. :thinking:

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